Do you agree or disagree with the following statement?

The kilogram is the only base SI unit with an SI prefix (kilo) as part of its name. The word kilogramme or kilogram is derived from the French kilogramme,[8] which itself was a learned coinage, prefixing the Greek stem of χίλιοι khilioi "a thousand" to gramma, a Late Latin term for "a small weight", itself from Greek γράμμα.[9] The word kilogramme was written into French law in 1795, in the Decree of 18 Germinal,[10] which revised the provisional system of units introduced by the French National Convention two years earlier, where the gravet had been defined as weight (poids) of a cubic centimetre of water, equal to 1/1000 of a grave.[11] In the decree of 1795, the term gramme thus replaced gravet, and kilogramme replaced grave. The French spelling was adopted in Great Britain when the word was used for the first time in English in 1795,[12][8] with the spelling kilogram being adopted in the United States. In the United Kingdom both spellings are used, with "kilogram" having become by far the more common.[13] UK law regulating the units to be used when trading by weight or measure does not prevent the use of either spelling.[14] In the 19th century the French word kilo, a shortening of kilogramme, was imported into the English language where it has been used to mean both kilogram[15] and kilometre.[16] While kilo as an alternative is acceptable, to The Economist for example,[17] the Canadian government's Termium Plus system states that "SI (International System of Units) usage, followed in scientific and technical writing" does not allow its usage and it is described as "a common informal name" on Russ Rowlett's Dictionary of Units of Measurement.[18][19] When the United States Congress gave the metric system legal status in 1866, it permitted the use of the word kilo as an alternative to the word kilogram,[20] but in 1990 revoked the status of the word kilo.[21] The SI system was introduced in 1960, and in 1970 the BIPM started publishing the SI Brochure, which contains all relevant decisions and recommendations by the CGPM concerning units. The SI Brochure states that "It is not permissible to use abbreviations for unit symbols or unit names ..."
Submitted by Takhir Tashmatov on
What to do next: